How Far Does a Pine Tree Reach? (video)

The video shows a collective performance with children from Hagaskolan in Vallentuna. The performance was part of a one year long participatory and performative process that My Lindh had carried out in the forest of Kristineberg in Vallentuna. Lindh, together with children from class 5b in Hagaskolan, approached the pine by testing the extent of their own bodies in relation to the pine. What happens in the meeting between the forest and the human, how much time and place does a human take and how far does a pine tree reach?


Camera: Nima Shirali and Sven Blume
Editing: My Lindh
Produced with kind support from Vallentuna municipality
Special thanks to the children in 5b, Hagaskolan and Anders Dagsberg, ecologist in Vallentuna municipality

Public Movement

Through a number of text messages, the audience was instructed to make everyday movements related to their cell phones, like turning up the volume of the phone, lifting the phone to the ear, or walking around, while holding the phone. The messages were successively spread to the audience through an instruction to forward all the messages to everyone in the gallery that they had the number to. The participants became quiet and concentrated on their cell phones. Scattered signals were heard when the text messages were received. After a while, the audience moved, on instruction, towards the scene located in the inner room of the gallery, where the light was turned off. When everyone was seated in the grandstand they were instructed to repeatedly turn off and on the light of their cell phones. Finally an audio file was distributed. Successively the room was filled with the suggestive sound of a foghorn. Public Movement was performed at Stage Walla in the framework of the exhibition Manifest Traces by Victoria Brännström and Lea Ahmed Jussilainen.

Performance Jukkasjärvi

The performance was carried out at the Jukkasjärvi Icehotel. The performance started with me standing in the cinema of the Icehotel in front of a screen and aiming a camera at the snow-covered ground. From the camera one could see a long cable leading to the source of the back-projection. On the screen the audience could see what they assumed was a live broadcast of what I was filming (the ground). After a while, I left the room, slowly walking through the Icehotel and outside, still filming the ground. Outside I put the camera on a tripod and filmed the moonlit landscape. Soon one could see me coming running from the left. When I reached the center of the picture, I suddenly disappeared – as if cut away. Those who followed the cable found that it had been cut off.


My Andersson [Lindh] blurred the line between mediated and physical presence the opposite way: she walked out of the Icehotel with a video camera pointed to the snow-covered floor, seemingly transmitting simultaneously onto the screen via a long cable, until she fixed the camera to a tripod outside to capture a picturesque night-time landscape with moon and stars.
Suddenly a figure at a distance ran across the image and vanished, like a ghost, right in the middle of it. Puzzled, some followed the cable like Ariadne’s thread, only to find it cut off at the end – the scene had not been ‘live’, but entirely recorded beforehand.

—Jörg Heiser, Frieze Magazine, Issue 58, April 2001

You Are Here Now

A performance that takes place in the relation between three subjects: a Text, a Me and a You.

The text addresses questions of the responsibilities and room for manoeuvre of the Text, the You (who is the reader of the text) and the I (who is the writer of the text). Passages of the texts take shape as an inner monologue of the I, through personal account of the doubts, hopes and efforts of writing.

The questions of the performance span across subjects of play, power, responsibility, position, presence, materiality, resistance and crisis.


Published in Paletten Art Journal #317, September 25, 2019

I Only Get to Borrow the Forest

The exhibition in the Möklintas Community Center came as a result of a three-week artist residency in the village of Möklinta outside Sala, Sweden. The exhibition took its starting point in some of the stories and collaborations that the villagers of Möklinta had shared with me during my residency.

Together with the nonprofit association World Cup Woodpilers and Möklinta school’s fourth graders, we built a woodpile in the middle of the Community Center’s large hall. On the wall behind the woodpile was hung a photograph of the almost 18 metres high woodpile that was built in 1992 in Möklinta. The pile became the world’s highest and led to the formation of the World Cup Woodpilers. The group has since worked as an NGO for disadvantaged families in Tukums, Latvia.

In another part of the hall, the local weaving group Möklinta Shuttlers showed their weaves. The group consists of around twenty members who have met and woven together for over 20 years.

Through the hall, the sound of the three church choirs of Möklinta, recorded during an exercise, echoed. From another speaker was heard the whisper of the wind, a direct sound from a microphone set in a tree just outside the Community Center.

Based on conversations with Möklinta residents, I produced quotes and installed them on one of the hall’s short sides. Some quotes were also found in three photographs taken in an old forest in Möklinta. The title of the exhibition comes from one of the quotes. At the inauguration I performed a performance / reading.

A video made by Lars Dareberg:


The residency was supported by the Aguéli Museum, Sala Municipality, Möklinta Community Center, The Region of Västmanland, Konstfrämjandet Västmanland and Kulturrådet.

Poetry Politics

Poetry Politics was a manifestation and a participatory performance initiated by Monica Sand and My Lindh. The piece was enacted just before each of the two Swedish elections in 2014. In May, just before the European Parliament Election it was performed at Sergels torg, Stockholm, and in September, just before the General Election, at Medborgarplatsen, Stockholm.

Anyone who wanted could participate by bringing a fictional text, in any language, and read aloud, standing at the square. One could alternate reading with strolling, while listening to others read.

Poesis originates from a Greek word, that in its basic form means make. A making that elevates the needs of everyday life, into a matter of public concern.

Politics: from the Greek word for statesmanship, civic, citizen, the process to take and practice power in a public context.


Images from the performance Poetry Politics at Sergels torg before the European Parliament Election in May 2014.

More on the performance: Playing the Space (Monica Sand)